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On August 24th, the Government of Zambia, through Permanent Secretary for the Ministry of Tourism & Arts, Stephen Mwansa, affirmed its commitment to strong, regional conservation efforts by signing the Arusha Declaration on Regional Conservation & Combating Wildlife/Environmental Crime.

The Arusha Declaration calls for comprehensive collaborative actions to advance transborder conservation and stem the illicit procurement and trade of wildlife and natural resources.

The ICCF Group, collaborating with governments in East and Southern Africa, supported the development and signing of the Arusha Declaration in 2014, alongside key development partners, including the Global Environment Facility, the World Bank, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the United Nations Development Programme, and the U.S. Department of State. In 2015, prior to Zambia's official signing, The ICCF Group worked with the government to implement aspects of the accord, facilitating the signing of the bilateral Agreement on the Coordinated Conservation and Management of the Miombo/Mopane Woodland Ecosystem between Zambia and Tanzania to coordinate the conservation and management of the Miombo/Mopane woodlands, a critical habitat for migratory wildlife in the region. This was one of two bilateral agreements signed in 2015 as part of the implementation of the Arusha Declaration. The other, the Agreement on the Coordinated Conservation and Management of the Niassa-Selous Ecosystem, has been reached between the governments of Tanzania and Mozambique.


By officially signing the Arusha Declaration, Zambia joins its neighbors in the region - Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, Burundi, and South Sudan - in continuing to pursue further cooperative actions for the conservation of Africa's vast natural wealth.

Click here to read the 2014 Arusha Declaration on Regional Conservation & Combating Wildlife/Environmental Crime.


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